Topological morphogenesis of neuroepithelial organoids

Research output: Contribution to journalResearch articleContributedpeer-review

Contributors

  • Keisuke Ishihara - , Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Max-Planck-Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Center for Systems Biology Dresden (CSBD), TUD Dresden University of Technology, Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP), University of Pittsburgh (Author)
  • Arghyadip Mukherjee - , Clusters of Excellence PoL: Physics of Life, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Max-Planck-Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Center for Systems Biology Dresden (CSBD), Laboratoire de physique de l’École Normale Supérieure (Author)
  • Elena Gromberg - , Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP) (Author)
  • Jan Brugués - , Clusters of Excellence PoL: Physics of Life, Chair of Spatiotemporal Organization of Subcellular Structures (CMCB), Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Max-Planck-Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Center for Systems Biology Dresden (CSBD) (Author)
  • Elly M. Tanaka - , Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP) (Author)
  • Frank Jülicher - , Max-Planck-Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Center for Systems Biology Dresden (CSBD), TUD Dresden University of Technology (Author)

Abstract

Animal organs exhibit complex topologies involving cavities and tubular networks, which underlie their form and function1–3. However, how topology emerges during the development of organ shape, or morphogenesis, remains elusive. Here we combine tissue reconstitution and quantitative microscopy to show that tissue topology and shape is governed by two distinct modes of topological transitions4,5. One mode involves the fusion of two separate epithelia and the other involves the fusion of two ends of the same epithelium. The morphological space is captured by a single control parameter that can be traced back to the relative rates of the two epithelial fusion modes. Finally, we identify a pharmacologically accessible pathway that regulates the frequency of two modes of epithelial fusion, and demonstrate the control of organoid topology and shape. The physical principles uncovered here provide fundamental insights into the self-organization of complex tissues6.

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)177-183
Number of pages7
JournalNature physics
Volume19(2023)
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 21 Nov 2022
Peer-reviewedYes

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